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Check out these magnificent rooms in Italian homes—these spaces were made for living la dolce vita, From AD

Martyn Lawrence Bullard designed the interiors of this restored medieval castle in Umbria. The great hall features 18th-century French armchairs upholstered in appliquéd leather, a table draped in a Coraggio fabric, and stools from Mecox; the mantel is from an Italian monastery, and the tapestry is 17th-century Flemish.

In the library of Count Raniero Gnoli’s apartment near Rome, scalloped strips of hand-decorated leather protect books from dust. He designed the glass-and-iron bell-jar lantern and had it handmade in India; a late-18th-century Italian armchair is pulled up to the 19th-century walnut table.

“Our objective was to restore the property to its original splendor,” Susie Ropolo says of a run-down country estate in Moncalieri that she and her husband, Gianni, revived. The terra-cotta floor was salvaged from another room.

In a restored farmhouse at the western edge of Umbria, the arch between the living room and the entrance hall was re-created from the original structure.

Studio Peregalli transformed Villa Bucciol, a home in the town of Oderzo, near Venice. Facing the living room’s 16th-century fireplace are a pair of armchairs dressed in arras tapestry; a 17th-century gilt-wood chandelier hangs above, and an antique Oushak covers the floor.

At Castello di Reschio, architect Benedikt Bolza and his wife Nencia’s sprawling Umbrian estate, the garden room is distinguished by original limed-oak beams and a mantelpiece crafted from reclaimed sandstone.

 

 

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Second Shout Out

As it prepares to celebrate its 90th anniversary, Fendi is fusing its image with a beloved symbol of Rome—and it’s an impressive and imposing one at that: the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana.

The project to transform the 75-year-old, never-occupied structure, which features six stories of symmetrical arches and is nicknamed “the Square Colosseum,” into new corporate headquarters for Fendi’s 450 employees was spearheaded by chairman and chief executive officer Pietro Beccari. “It was my dream to reunite all employees under the same roof, but the square footage available around town remained a problem,” said the executive during an exclusive tour of the site, due to be officially unveiled during a special event at the end of September or early October.

The striking 205,200-square-foot structure perched on a hill with a panoramic view of the Italian capital is a statement in theatricality, its grand scale and location contributed to its neglect over the years—until Fendi stepped up. Renovations to the travertine marble palazzo will be completed by the end of the year to welcome employees who currently work in two offices in the city separated by a 30-minute drive. The house’s archives and its fur atelier will be located on the lower floor, while a 10,800-square-foot exhibition space on the ground level will hold art, history and design installations open to the public, as well as a café and bookshop.

The Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, designed in 1937 by architects Giovanni Guerrini, Ernesto Bruno La Padula and Mario Romano, was inaugurated in 1940 and was meant to be a gateway from the coast to the city as part of the international Expo of 1942—which never took place because of World War II. “It’s symbolic that the palazzo will be officially unveiled in September at the same time as the Expo in Milan is taking place,” said Beccari, referring to the event that runs from May to the end of October.

Fendi inked an agreement in 2013 to rent the building for 15 years, renewable for another 15, and started working on the space in July 2014. The structure was “an empty box,” noted Beccari, as it was incomplete and had barely been used since the war, although in June 2013 Giorgio Armani held his One Night Only event in part of the palazzo. The exteriors did not require any significant renovation, but the interiors needed to be reformatted for office purposes.

At Palazzo Fendi on Via Condotti in central Rome, the former offices will most likely be converted into a center of cultural interest and the flagship is slated to expand onto a third level that will include a space dedicated to VIP customers.

Credit WWD

Brava

 

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Second Shout Out

"With each garden, with each project we are going deeper into the understanding of ourselves. As in life, we take courage to move forward from our own image of what people think we are or in fact what we believe ourselves to be." ~ Luciano Giubbilei

Luciano Giubbilei is a landscape design practice that focuses on the development of its work based on close and constant dialogue with architects, plantsmen, craftsmen and selected specialists on a wide range of projects, from private gardens to rural landscapes through to institutional spaces. Collaboration has always been at the centre of our design development; instead of designing with a singular vision, we relish the spirit of collaboration. It is that which pushes our creative process harder and harder, moving us from our familiar language.

Known today for the understated elegance and serenity of our gardens, defined by light and influenced by the classical Italian design heritage of proportion and balance. They are developed through the exploration of spacing, rhythm and the repetition of single elements. Our motivation is to create timeless spaces, multi-layered environments where culture and nature are in close communication. Our approach is constantly evolving, both in response to individual clients and to the unique site characteristics, to forge an emotional connection between the place and the people, valuing local materials and expressing our desire to connect people to nature not merely through plants and flowers but through the spacial arrangement and its beauty.

 

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Second Shout Out

A warm welcome to Memorial Day Weekend.  We thought these Shingle Style Summer homes were a perfect way to start off summer. AD is featuring these homes from the  beautiful East Coast, known for shingled homes. One is overlooking the water on Nantucket another is in the Southhamptons of New York, East Quogue, New York and finally Long Island.

We are wishing you all a wonderful start for Summer and a Happy Memorial Weekend.

 

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Second Shout Out

The Epic Wedding Location, Ribbon Chapel is a wedding venue designed by architect Hiroshi Nakamura whose beautiful creation brings out the romantic in all of us. Located at the Seto Inland Sea Resort in Japan, the building rises above the trees with criss-crossing spiral stairs that softly come together at the top. This is appropriately symbolic for an event that’s centered around the journey, bond, and the uniting of two lives and families.

The modern-yet-minimal looking exterior plays with our perception, and the strands look as though they are floating on their own. Thanks to its transparent interior, the stunning effect not only adds to the building's aesthetic value, but is the way that the structure supports itself.

There’s the belief that it’s bad luck for the couple to see each other before the ceremony, and Ribbon Chapel seems to have planned for this superstition. Each person can climb or descend the stairs separately and out of sight, therefore keeping their good luck intact. Guests can observe the union from the yard below and later take in the view of the Setouchi Sea at the observation deck at the top of the chapel.

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Gail Smith-Peterson

Saturday’s “Designing with Vintage” with Gail Smith-Peterson
Vintage Spaces
The spaces we live in are inspired by our individual tastes, surroundings and our climate.  The one common old thorn in the side, is the budget. The advantage of any budget is we can become quite clever and creative with the means we have.
Personally I live resourceful and all my projects have a tight budget. It’s all about the squeeze to get things in, that where the fun begins. Vintage living fits beautifully with those criteria. See if you can spot all the vintage elements in these spaces! Check out SSO vintage furniture and vintage accents to get the looks below.

My design tip: Vintage items if purchased at a fair value will not only retain their value but possibly may appreciate over time. Be sure to care for them properly.

A beautiful Spring weekend to you!

xo,
Gail
TEAM & Lifestyle Vintage Contributor
Visit Casual Loves Elegance Store at Second Shout Out 
Photo source: Pinterest

 

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Second Shout Out

The firm Ingrao Inc. devised sumptuous interiors for the Manhattan apartment owned by jewelry designer Kara Ross and her husband, real-estate developer Stephen Ross.

The living room features Maria Pergay sconces and Philippe Hiquily side tables, all vintage pieces from Galerie Yves Gastou, as well as a 1920s French lacquer cocktail table, a Jean-Michel Frank–style sectional sofa by Jonas, and a circa-1950 Edward Wormley slipper chair from Duane Modern. The tabletop sculpture at far left is by Martin Megna.

Breathtaking city views unfold across the living room's floor-to-ceiling windows, which are curtained in an Armani/Casa fabric. The 1940s French mahogany floor lamps are from L'Art de Vivre, the papier-mâché sculpture of birch tree trunks is by Kim Krans, and the carpet is by Edward Fields.

A handblown-glass-and-bronze chandelier designed by Randy Kemper and created by Megna Glass hangs above the dining room's 1960s French table, which is surrounded by Jonas chairs in a Holland & Sherry fabric; the ceiling is clad in a Roger Arlington paper, the sconce is by Hervé Van der Straeten, and the rug is by Edward Fields.

The kitchen has a Poliform island, hood, and cabinetry, as well as a Miele cooktop and a Jeff Koons Puppy vase.

The family room features Art Deco side chairs and an ebony table.

In the master bedroom, '60s Lucite lamps from John Salibello stand atop custom-made John Boone night tables flanking the bespoke bed, which was fabricated by Jonas and upholstered in an Edelman leather; the bed linens are from Stella, the embroidered throw pillows are by Holland & Sherry, a Rose Tarlow Melrose House leather clads the Hervé Van der Straeten bench from Ralph Pucci International, and the carpet is by Edward Fields.

Credit: AD

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Second Shout Out

UK-based photographer, who goes by the nickname CriticalMass, shares his passion for exploring abandoned places through his haunting photography of Italian ruins. With these melancholy shots, the photographer takes us on a tour through abandoned orphanages, hospitals, villas, mortuaries and industrial complexes in Italy. The location of the places are intentionally left unpublished, as the artist claims he wants to prevent these places from possible damage.

Despite his wonderful talent and strong passion for photography, CriticalMass is extremely modest and doesn’t like calling himself a photographer. He works as a postman during the day, and photography is his one great hobby. The artist is mostly interested in so-called “urban exploration,” especially in abandoned places that nature has begun to reclaim. He has spent 5 years travelling around Europe and documenting abandoned places with his emotionally gripping touch. He says: “It’s about seeing the unseen, going where the ‘No Trespassing’ signs says you can’t, to see what lies behind closed doors.“

Demilked
uecriticalmass.co.uk

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Second Shout Out

The Greenwich Hotel TriBeCa Penthouse
Designer Axel Vervoordt and architect Tatsuro Miki utilized the ancient Japanese aesthetic sense of wabi to create a meditative haven within the 6,800 square foot pied-a-terre atop the Greenwich Hotel — owned by Robert De Niro, Ira Drukier, and other partners — in TriBeCa, New York. The top-level penthouse is designed to integrate as much as possible into the nineteenth century industrial neighborhood, using local materials, such as stone and reclaimed wood, providing an authentic feel for its guests and neighbors.  Incorporating antique and custom-made fixtures and furnishings, the penthouse includes a large open floor-plan with multi-purpose living spaces, including a separate living room and drawing room, a full sized chef’s kitchen, three fireplaces, two and half bathrooms and three bedrooms, including a master suite. The 4,000 square foot multi-leveled terrace includes lush gardens with wisteriawrapped pergolas, multiple seating and dining areas, a spa pool, a large gas grill, and an outdoor wood-burning fireplace.

Credit for Post: Urdesign

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Second Shout Out

Ralph Lauren's first-ever New York restaurant opens today, conveniently located right next door to the new Polo Ralph Lauren flagship store on Fifth Avenue. The luxe décor is what you'd expect: leather banquettes, equestrian art, and plenty of plaid. It's a nice addition to the still-desolate midtown scene — an elegant venue for classic cocktails and well-executed, simple dishes like oysters, crab cakes, and beef from Lauren's ranch in Colorado. This is actually only Lauren's third restaurant in the world, and the Chicago and Paris establishments are wildly popular. Take a look at the food and the space, and book your next power meal.

1 EAST 55TH STREET
212.207.8562

 

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